All Hail Breaks Loose

I wasn’t too excited about the photographs I found on my laptop for the day after the big hike, but then when I checked my phone I remembered why there were so few. If my memory serves me correctly, we woke up in the middle of the night to the sound of hail hitting the roof and then when we set out for a short local trek before taking vehicles to other trails, finding hail piled up almost a foot high on the gravel road.

So it looks like it was a cloudy, iffy day weather-wise, and eventually we had hail again. Only this time we were safe inside the vehicles.

The video and these images are from the cell phone. A dramatic landscape enhanced by weather.

Two birds willingly posed within range that day: the Audubon’s Yellow-Rumped Warbler at the top of the page and this lovely Say’s Phoebe.

But also ubiquitous on the entire trip were Bell’s Vireos. We didn’t always see them but we definitely heard them every day.

Bell’s Vireo
A distant Yellow-Breasted Chat

Dark, cloudy and distant pictures of two hummingbirds (Lucifer on the upper left and middle and Broad-Tailed below, right) and a Varied Bunting in between them.

We visited this amazing fossil discovery exhibit which is in Big Bend National Park.

Some flora which I might be able to identify if I could just find the laminated checklist of Big Bend wildflowers I purchased at the Visitors Center. Looking through even more pictures on the internet makes it tempting to revisit this area some day. I want to come back as a plant fanatic.

Not sure who this is either…
A distant but very cooperative Loggerhead Shrike.
Black-Chinned Sparrow
This was the vista behind the Bell’s Vireo above.
A Rock Squirrel and his rock.

There are four more days of photographs from the Southwest Texas trip to decipher. Then it’s onward to rejuvenate or replace the travel laptop before I take it on another adventure coming up next month!

Big Bend: The Big Hike to Boot Springs

Colima Warbler

The third day of my trip to Big Bend National Park, the group started the hike up the mountain trail to Boot Canyon. In spite of the fact that my right knee issues had slowed me down, I intended to do the entire hike, which was advertised as a ten-hour expedition up and back, but I’m sure it took me longer than that! The decision whether to continue down to Boot Springs was at the halfway mark with the spectacular view of the “Boot”, and I figured I wasn’t coming back to do this again, so the only way to go was onward.

The object of what is always lovingly referred to as a “forced march” in birding was to see the elusive Colima Warbler. As it turns out, those of us who made the trip to Boot Canyon saw four or five of these individuals, but I don’t remember encountering any on the way up to the decision point, so my election to go the entire hike was fortuitous.

Chisos Basin, with the lodge in distant view…

On the way, we encountered this Black-Crested Titmouse, a species seen almost on the entire trip, but nevertheless a bit challenging to capture, so I was glad to have a picture of this individual.

Black-Crested Titmouse

One thing I discovered, though, on this hike, was that my decision to take the biggest lens may not have been wise. Actually, the Tamron lens barely survived the trip: by the end, the rubber gasket on the focus wheel was loose to the point where I could barely take a picture. I ordered a replacement, but I haven’t attached it yet. Instead, ever since I got back from the trip I’ve been using my Canon 100-400mm lens and, combined with my best camera, I think this is the way to go, so I’m reluctant to pick up the Tamron again although I’m sure I will before I decide what its ultimate fate will be.

But the biggest problem on this particular day was that somehow, on the way down to Boot Springs, my settings on the camera changed, and I was oblivious to the fact that I was shooting on “M” which I guess is the manual setting I never use, until long after the stop at Boot Springs where we encountered all these delightful warblers availing themselves of the water feature. In effect I had nice photographs of some rocks because they required no attention to shutter speed. So there I was in heaven at least looking at these amazingly beautiful birds, but not capturing them entirely with the camera. I am surprised that I was able to salvage the photographs you see here, which are certainly not of high quality but at least you can see what the birds look like. Something to learn from an exhausting hike situation. Be Over-Prepared. Or don’t forget to check your camera settings after: adjusting your pack, tying your boots, grabbing your water…

Anyway, in addition to the Colima, the Lucy’s and the Hermit were lifers for me.

Lucy’s Warbler

Some other species I’ll likely not see again…

Rock Squirrel
Threadleaf Phlox

The Slate-throated Redstart was a very hot item, and I’m sorry I didn’t get a decent picture of it, but it’s here anyway as a memory. Apparently this bird is more common south of the Rio Grande.

Variable Dancer
Eastern Fence Lizard

So all in all it was an exhaustingly beautiful experience, one I will always treasure, and I survived! Now if I can just get through the rest of my pictures from this trip before I go on the next one. More to come. Summer is upon us.