Last Saturday at Columbus Park

GBHE Columbus Park 10-6-18-2039

Great Blue Heron with prey

Columbus Day has come and gone for another year. Even after suggestions that we rename it Native American Annihilation Day, it would be cumbersome to re-label everything presently Columbus. Columbus Park has been around for a long time. According to the Chicago Park District, it is considered the finest example of landscape architect Jens Jensen’s output and was designated a National Historic Landmark in 2003.

RCKI Columbus Park 10-6-18-2005

Ruby-Crowned Kinglet

I’ve been too busy looking for birds to photograph the landscaping but I’ll try to keep it in mind since I have one more planned visit next Saturday. After that I will be free to go anywhere or not. The morning started out cloudy and wet but improved. We park in the golfers parking lot, where there were many intrepid golfers by the time I arrived. Early on, the birds were not easy to spot last Saturday. They were either too far away to see clearly and/or tangled in dense multicolored foliage. Above is a Ruby-Crowned Kinglet. Below is a photograph that may or may not have a bird in it, to give you an example…

Puzzle Columbus Park 10-6-18-1997And then when I did eventually find a bird and tried to enlarge the photograph enough for identification purposes…

Baypoll Warbler Columbus Park 10-6-18-1955

This is a Bay-Breasted Warbler. Even after ebird insists nobody can tell a Bay-Breasted from a Blackpoll this time of year, the configuration of the wing bars, the faint rosy wash on the flank and the facial pattern all tell me it’s a Bay-Breasted.

PIWA Columbus Park 10-6-18-2047

This is a Pine Warbler that we actually glimpsed better naked eye than with the camera.

For one thing I have been able to exercise my desire to see a Yellow-Bellied Sapsucker the last week or so. Below is one from Columbus Park…

YBSA Columbus Park 10-6-18-1779and a couple days earlier, from the park at 311 South Wacker, a block away from my office. Notice all the sap-holes in the bark!

YBSA 10-4-18-1747Even though Red-Winged Blackbirds don’t migrate far, I think we’ve seen the last of them in these parts until they return to nest in the spring.

RWBL Columbus Park 10-6-18-1968Another off-site but maybe not off-topic bird is the Ovenbird below. One or two of these have been hanging out at 311 South Wacker. I think I had eight of them at one time in the spring.

I would be remiss if I didn’t include a Nashville Warbler…

NAWA Columbus Park 10-6-18-1982And the large pond that attracts so much waterfowl…

MALL Columbus Park 10-6-18-1823Then I was intrigued by the fungus that had adopted a tree stump.

Fungus Columbus Park 10-6-18-2010We saw the Great Blue Heron early on and then later when it was trying to negotiate a slippery fish.

Our last bird was perhaps the nicest surprise. A Cooper’s Hawk perched directly overhead.

COHA Columbus Park 10-6-18-2055I am going to Thatcher Woods tomorrow morning for the last walk there, and I have absolutely no idea what to expect. We are currently experiencing cold, cloudy weather. The forecast for tomorrow is sunny and moderately cool. I plan to get in as much birding as possible before I tend to my weekend chores because Sunday is going to be challenging. The choir sings in the morning, and in the afternoon I’m attending a “Soul Connections” group I joined several months ago, then directly after that, my first attendance at a writer’s workshop, led by one of the SC group’s participants – an activity I haven’t attempted in many, many years. I think I’ve come to the conclusion that we have to connect with each other on multiple levels if we’re going to get through this. 🙂

 

13 thoughts on “Last Saturday at Columbus Park

  1. An interesting post all round. Good bird spotting and I like the idea of renaming Columbus day. My choice would be ‘There Were People Here Before Day’. Your last remarks are very pertinent.

    • I like your choice. I was reading a couple days ago about new research into how advanced and populous civilizations in the Americas were before the “explorers” brought smallpox and everything else invasive with them… Unfortunately it’s easier to rewrite or ignore history altogether.

  2. what a nice number of species. I opted out of coming as it was raining, but of course by the time rolled around it had stopped. Good for you.

  3. Seems like Nature is busy with the SouthEast and giving you extra sunny days. I think I heard that there’s a cold from coming from the far North. This morning we were 49º F. After being in the high 80.s tree days ago!
    You’re still finding birds in the woods… they are not migrating yet. Nice post Lisa.
    I’m not fond of rewriting History at all. 🙂

    • You know, I’m not all that sure they visit feeders, although I think they might try to sip from a hummingbird feeder… They have a very distinctive swooping flight as they zip into the trees to extract sap. In any event, I haven’t seen any for a few days so they may be gone already. They all tend to show up sort of at once, so maybe spring will give you a chance to see one!

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