Requiem Eternam…

AMRO & DOWP 04-08-18-9175

Two “regulars” in the Rosebud

How long does it take to stop hearing a piece like the Faure Requiem in one’s head? The powerful experience Sunday morning of singing the Requiem twice as a member of the Unity Temple Choir, after the anticipation of the event woke me up periodically the night before, not to mention the weeks of rehearsal: I guess I have been living the Requiem. In spite of the incessant rain we had an ample and appreciative audience. After services the rain stopped for a while, so I took a walk around my neighborhood to see what spring migrants, if any, were trapped by the cold north winds. Internally possessed by the music, birding allowed the music to go on playing in my head at full blast. So far I have gotten through yesterday and this morning with my usual distractions of Spanish and French on the phone and summoning Peter Mayer on my way into the office, but bits and pieces of the Requiem still haunt me. Yesterday with the Kyrie it occurred to me that I caused conversations to be held in D minor.

Here’s a little roundup of two weekends in the yard and environs. I struggle with how long I can endure the cold, and the birds struggle with deciding when their hunger overcomes their inability to ignore my presence.

YBSA 04-15-18-9754

Yellow-Bellied Sapsucker inspecting the utility pole

More Yellow-Bellied Sapsuckers in the conifers around the edge of Freedom Park which is just at the end of my block.

The rain changed to snow overnight. Again. It’s as if there was a repeat sign at the end of last weekend. While I am still thankful for my undisturbed leaf litter cradling the new green shoots that seem to be emerging from the soil nevertheless, the greenery is beginning to look tired and frozen. The snow shots are from last weekend when unfortunately I had to take them through the porch windows.

NOCA 04-09-18-9472

HETH 04-15-18-9841

Hermit Thrush (Freedom Park)

The mourning doves are in full courtship mode, in spite of the chill.

Dark-Eyed Juncos have been a force, and it’s delightful to hear them sing on occasion. I love the subtlety of their individual variations in plumage.

Last Sunday I was surprised to discover an Oregon Dark-Eyed Junco in the yard. There are six subspecies of Dark-Eyed Junco, and the one we get consistently is the Slate-Colored. The easternmost normal occurrence of the Oregon in its winter range is Nebraska and its breeding range is in the northwest, so it’s considered rare in Illinois. There have been a couple other reports of other individuals locally.

The American Goldfinches are coming into their breeding plumage slowly but steadily, some more advanced than others. I’ve been seeing mainly males at the feeders.

One of my backyard robins put on a little fashion show using the new back gate as its catwalk.

Ho hum winter grey clouds…

A little ray of sunshine: a goldfinch enjoying a drink of water.

AMG0 04-08-18-9339On the radio this morning I heard that this date last year, we were in the 80’s. Likely I was complaining about that. Oh well. We won’t be getting anywhere near that for a while, I suspect, but with any luck we are done with snow until – dare I say it – November.

DOWP 04-08-18-9159

8 thoughts on “Requiem Eternam…

  1. I’m getting the feeling that we are sharing the same birds in our backyards! The weather sucks! Pardon my French. This morning at 6:30 was at 32ºF, they predict the weather for tomorrow to reach 85º !! I have a lot of plants, flowers etc.Poor things, they must be very confused with this weather.
    Your mind still trying to translate every sound into music, you better take it pianissimo my friend… 🙂

    • The music never stops, but that’s my normal operating system. Remember, after the Big Bang there was a Big Chord.
      I just hope the birds and bees and frogs and everything can figure out how to proceed. We are all confused. 🙂

  2. I like the idea of having a conversation in D minor. Our conversation at the moment is very flat (D flat?) because of the weather but our weather is by no means as dismal as yours. I hope that the snow really has gone at last. You got a lot of very good pictures of birds all the same.

    • I think they might prefer conifers. But I’ve seen them drill holes in just about anything. Used to see neatly drilled successions of holes in the bark of trees in Grant Park. But they were definitely flitting around in the pines at the park by my house. There are likely some in your neighborhood as they have been all over the area. Reported at Northwestern campus, Ladd Arboretum…

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